Know Your Beef Cuts

 

Most tender steaks come from the center (rib and loin sections) of the animal and are usually cooked by dry-heat methods.

Less tender steaks are from the more exercised fore- and hindquarters of the animal and benefit most from moist-heat cooking. These cuts include full-cut round, eye round and bottom round; chuck shoulder, chuck 7-Bone, chuck arm and chuck blade; flank and skirt. Some of these less tender cuts, including top round steak, may be cooked with dry heat after tenderizing in a marinade.

Roasts
Most tender steaks come from the center (rib and loin sections) of the animal and are usually cooked by dry-heat methods. You can find tender steaks at different price points.

Strip (top loin), T-Bone, Porterhouse, ribeye, rib, and tenderloin, usually have a higher price per pound, but you can also find tender steaks that are a good choice for family meals such as ranch (shoulder center), top sirloin, flat iron (shoulder top blade), chuck eye and round tip.

POTROASTS
Pot roasts also come from the fore- and hindquarters of the carcass. These muscles are more heavily exercised and contain more connective tissue, making them less tender. Moist-heat cooking takes more time, but the results are worth waiting for. The beef becomes fork-tender and develops a savory depth of flavor unique to slow-cooked beef.

Pot roasts from the chuck have more fat, and thus more flavor, than those from the round, but many beef chuck and round cuts can be used interchangeably in pot roast recipes, requiring only slight adjustments in cooking times.

STIRFRY
Pot roasts also come from the fore- and hindquarters of the carcass. These muscles are more heavily exercised and contain more connective tissue, making them less tender. Moist-heat cooking takes more time, but the results are worth waiting for. The beef becomes fork-tender and develops a savory depth of flavor unique to slow-cooked beef.

Pot roasts from the chuck have more fat, and thus more flavor, than those from the round, but many beef chuck and round cuts can be used interchangeably in pot roast recipes, requiring only slight adjustments in cooking times. .

STEW
One of the homiest comfort foods, beef stew practically cooks itself as it slowly simmers on the stove. Beef for stew is boneless, pre-cut cubes, typically from the chuck or round. The ideal size for uniform cooking is about a 3/4 to 1-1/2 inch cube.

If you prefer to cut your own cubes, any chuck or round cut -except top round – may be used. Trim the excess fat and cut into the appropriate size for your recipe.

Kabobs
Kabobs are a great crowd pleaser, whether you grill them outdoors or broil them indoors. You can turn a party interactive, by having your guest prepare their own skewers with their choice of vegetables,

Beef for kabobs is usually cut into 1 to 1-1/2 inch boneless pieces from the sirloin or round. Cubes cut from the round will benefit from a tenderizing marinade. Look for packages that have the most uniform size pieces.

You can trim any tender cut into the appropriate size cubes, taking care to keep the piece size as uniform as possible. Top sirloin or tenderloin are especially good choices.


Two Arkansas stones (Fine & Medium) & one Coarse synthetic stone.
Stones Mounted on Rotating Molded Plastic Triangle for Easy Stone Rotation and Identification
Molded Plastic Base with Nonskid Rubber Feet for Safety
“V” Trough to Catch the Solution
Sharpening Angle Guide Ensures Correct Angle every time

Interesting facts
The Stages of Beef Production

Beef production represents the largest single segment of American agriculture. In fact, USDA says more farms are classified as beef cattle operations (35%) than any other type.

Raising cattle involves numerous farms and operations, each serving a unique role in the process. At each stage, America’s farmers and ranchers strive to provide safe, high-quality beef for consumers while following best practices for raising cattle humanely.

Cow-Calf Operation . Beef production begins with ranchers who maintain a breeding herd of cows that nurture calves every year. When a calf is born, it weighs 60 to 100 pounds. Over the next few months, each calf will live off its mother’s milk and graze grass in pasture.

Weaning . Beef calves are weaned at six to 10 months of age when they weigh between 450 and 700 pounds. These calves are now grass-fed in pasture.

Stockers and Backgrounders . After weaning, cattle continue to grow and thrive by grazing during the stocker and backgrounder phase.

Livestock Auction Markets . After weaning and/or during the stocker and backgrounder phase, cows are sold at livestock auction markets. About 1/3 of cows stay on the farm for breeding purposes.

Feedlot . The next step in beef production is when mature calves are moved to feedlots

Here, they typically spend four to six months, during which time they have constant access to water, room to move around, and are free to graze at feed bunks containing a carefully balanced diet. Veterinarians, nutritionists, and cattlemen work together to look after each animal.

Packing House . Once cattle reach market weight (1,200 to 1,400 pounds and 18 to 22 months of age), they are sent to a processing facility. USDA inspectors are stationed in all federally inspected packing plants and oversee the implementation of safety, animal welfare, and quality standards from the time animals enter the plant until the final beef products are shipped to grocery stores and restaurants establishments.

Food Service and Retail . The final step in beef production is when beef is shipped and sold in the United States and abroad. In the retail and foodservice channels, operators take steps to provide consumers with the safest, wholesome and most nutritious products possible.

Wusthof Gourmet Cutlery Set – 23 Piece